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New publication: Neuropsychiatric symptoms in new‑onset epilepsy

Posted by Pohlmann-Eden B1, Aldenkamp A2, Baker GA3, Brandt C4, Cendes F5, Coras R6, Crocker CE7, Helmstaedter C8, Jones-Gotman M9, Kanner AM10, Mazarati A11, Mula M12, Smith ML13, Omisade A7, Tellez-Zenteno J14, Hermann BP15. on October 2, 2015 in Neuroradiology
Neurobehavioral and cognition problems are highly prevalent in epilepsy, but most research studies to date have not adequately addressed the precise nature of the relationship between these comorbidities and seizures.
Neurobehavioral and cognition problems are highly prevalent in epilepsy, but most research studies to date have not adequately addressed the precise nature of the relationship between these comorbidities and seizures.


To address this complex issue and to facilitate collaborative, innovative research in the rising field of neurobehavioral comorbidities and cognition disturbances in new-onset epilepsy, international epilepsy experts met at the 3rd Halifax International Epilepsy Conference & Retreat at White Point, South Shore, Nova Scotia, Canada from September 18 to 20, 2014. This Conference Proceedings provides a summary of the conference proceedings. Specifically, the following topics are discussed: (i) role of comorbidities in epilepsy diagnosis and management, (ii) role of antiepileptic medications in understanding the relationship between epilepsy and neurobehavioral and cognition problems, and (iii) animal data and diagnostic approaches. Evidence to date, though limited, strongly suggests a bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and cognitive and psychiatric comorbidities. In fact, it is likely that seizures and neurobehavioral problems represent different symptoms of a common etiology or network-wide disturbance. As a reflection of this shared network, psychiatric comorbidities and/or cognition problems may actually precede the seizure occurrence and likely get often missed if not screened.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


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