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Chief Medicine Residents

April 1, 2017 - December 31, 2017

Dr. Rachelle Blackman, PGY2, Co-chief medicine resident (Halifax site)

Home town: Moncton, New Brunswick
Medical School: Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick (DMNB)

Why were you interested in this leadership role?

Taking on the Chief role seemed like a natural next step in my educational career at Dalhousie. I also received my undergraduate degree at Dalhousie and feel truly at home within this institution. It seems fitting to give back and try to extend that feeling to my fellow residents. I am proud of our program, and I think the chief position gives me the opportunity to help it continue to grow in an effective way. I take this chief position with all its responsibility, and I realize the expectation from my peers is to do right by them and that’s my goal.

What unique contribution do you hope to make?

Residency is hard, that is no secret. However, it is also an incredibly rewarding experience best shared with others. It is my goal as Chief to work hard to encourage a fun, supportive and inclusive environment where residents can foster relationships with each other, staff, and their administration. I feel at home at Dalhousie, and I want all other residents to feel the same.

How will you know if you are successful?

If residents feel truly welcomed to discuss both positive and less than positive feedback with me or Co-Chief Harrison, to make our program better and supportive. If I can look around and see people sharing their lives and leaning on each other, that will feel like a success. Success will also be seeing residents continue to get excited about the program which creates the trickle-down effect we have just seen through the interest at CaRMS this year.

Dr. Harrison Petropolis, PGY2, Co-chief medicine resident (Halifax site)

Home town: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Medical School: Dalhousie Medical School

Why were you interested in this leadership role?

I wanted to give back to the Internal Medicine program which has given me so much. It is a great opportunity to work with the excellent administration (Sophie and Katie, Dr. Epstein) to try and improve our program.

What unique contribution do you hope to make?

I hope to guide our program through a major curriculum change to the timing of the Royal College exam.

How will you know if you are successful?

I’ll judge the success of our Chief term based on the wellness of my co-residents.

Dr. Heather Chambers, PGY2, Chief medicine resident (Saint John site)

Home town: Massachusetts
Medical School: Dalhousie Medical School

Why were you interested in this leadership role?

I felt very supported by my Chief Resident as a junior, and I want to do what I can to make the other residents in my program feel supported and empowered in their learning and in their professional roles.

What unique contribution do you hope to make?

I don’t think a contribution has to be unique to be valuable. I just want to be a resource for my program, and to serve the interests of the residents in the matters that affect all of us.

How will you know if you are successful?

If the internal medicine residents feel that I am a strong voice for their concerns, and a force that supports their interests and wellbeing in the context of our program.

Dr. Chris Green, PGY2, Associate Chief, Medical Teaching Unit (Halifax Site)

Home town: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Medical School: Dalhousie Medical School

Why were you interested in this leadership role?

I wanted this role because I love details, and I love administration. Sometimes the best way to treat a patient, is to treat the system they're in. Our Medical Teaching Unit (MTU) provides high quality patient care, and world class teaching; but there are always inefficiencies to improve, and always new ideas to try. The Associate Chief is the resident representative on the MTU committee, and I took on this role to make the MTU a better place for patients and learners.

What unique contribution do you hope to make?

I think my main contribution in this role will be providing a unique perspective. Residents are the "boots on the ground" on the MTU. Because of this, we are in a unique position to identify inefficiencies and problems on MTU – we live with them every day. I see the importance of the resident perspective to bring important issues to light and find creative solutions, which in the end can improve the care of our patients.

How will you know if you are successful?

I will call my short tenure as Associate Chief a success if residents feel they are working in a system that is (even slightly) more efficient. I want to leave an MTU that provides, ever-so-slightly better patient care, and ever-so-slightly better learning.